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Magnetic Motion NEXT COLLECTION CLICK ON IMAGE FOR FULL VIEW

Magnetic Motion
For her SS 15 ready-to-wear collection, presented in Paris on Sep 30th, 2014, Iris van Herpen explores the interplay of magnetic forces. By thoroughly examining the representation of dynamic forces of attraction and repulsion, the designer fuses nature and technology.
Earlier this year, van Herpen visited CERN the Large Hadron Collider, whose magnetic field exceeding that of earth’s by 20,000 times, provided inspiration for “Magnetic Motion”.
“I find beauty in the continual shaping of Chaos which clearly embodies the primordial power of nature’s performance,” says Van Herpen describing the essence of the collection.
Van Herpen stayed true to her spirit of bridging fashion and other disciplines by collaborating with the Canadian architect Philip Beesley, and the Dutch artist Jolan van der Wiel.
Beesley is a pioneer in responsive ‘living’ sculpture whose poetic works combine advanced computation, synthetic biology, and mechatronics engineering. Van der Wiel is an artist and craftsman whose work with magnetic tension has resulted in dynamic sculptures and installations that bring to mind the power of volcanic eruptions. Both artists strive to erase the boundaries between nature and technology in their work, which coincides with the direction of van Herpen’s creative aim.
The designer worked with techniques like injection molding and laser cutting on maze like structures, 3-D printing and intricate architectural handwork on dresses, jackets, trousers, skirts and blouses giving them dynamic shapes and surfaces that echo the body’s movement. The three dimensional nature and the layering of the garments give them volume.
Emphasizing light and shadow play, the minimalist color palette of black, white, midnight blue, and nude allows the designer to concentrate on the garments’ structure. Micro webs of lace veil and reveal the luminescent glow of crystal forms, while triacetate feathers punctuate the soft drapes and volumes. The controlled structure of the clothes is offset by the chaotic structure of the accessories, where, due to the nature of magnetic growth, no two items are alike. The shoes, belts, necklaces and clutches were “grown” using magnetic fields.

Biopiracy NEXT COLLECTION CLICK ON IMAGE FOR FULL VIEW

Biopiracy
In the recent past, patents on our genes have been purchased. Are we still the sole proprietor of our bodies?
From this question arises a sense of arrested freedom in one's most intimate, solitary state.
A mix of ready-to-wear and couture pieces is presented with artist Lawrence Malstaf -who specializes in the interaction between biology and physicality.
Models float in the air, embryonic, seemingly weightless and in a meditative suspended animation.
Metamorphosis is suggested through intricate enmeshing of materials. Imprisoned fire opal beads gleam through lacerated weaves, artificial fibers compose voluminous, architectural structures, the organic ripple of light on water.
A 3D printing collaboration with Julia Koerner fuses the artisanal with the technical to create a kinetic dress which dances as it amplifies bodily movement. Molded boots in collaboration with United Nude accelerate and reconfigure the silhouette.

Embossed Sounds CLICK ON IMAGE FOR FULL VIEW

Embossed Sounds
Fascinated by the relationship and potential porosity between the senses, Iris Van Herpen has developed clothes that generate sounds by touch.

‘Embossed Sounds’ is the name of her orchestra of human touch which explore garments as electronic instruments that one can touch and play. By touching the clothes, music is sculpted live by the models for their audience in an intimate performance.
Touch sensitive and sensual audio waves threading and weaving over the body creating an intricate sonic web. 
The collection plays on a visual duality, ambiguity, combining the ethereal feminine softness of plissé with the flick knife and swagger of the underground rebel biker :
embossed leather silhouettes embellished with laser cut lacquer leather laces, braiding techniques, and black mirrored handcrafted patterns.The garments  are made of handcrafted 3D silicone pressed structures in leather and high gloss 'liquid' fabrics, woven from silk and nylon threads.
In a black, silver, grey and blue shadow palette, Iris Van Herpen utilises materials ranging from Light georgette silk with woventranclucent acetate fibers to Matte microfiber with high gloss black embroidered thin Plexiglass and Shiny fluid translucent Japanese polyester.
3D pressed silicone is also used to create handcrafted embossed combat shoes.